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Antimicrobial Resistance – A Growing Threat

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is on the rise and is a serious threat to global public health1. If urgent action is not taken, by 2050, AMR will cause 10 million deaths a year globally, overtaking cancer as the biggest killer2

Antimicrobial stewardship has been identified by the Chief Medical Officer as one of the key responses to the challenge of antimicrobial resistance – including the rising resistance to carbapenems3

Why Tygacil for the treatment in cIAI and cSSTI?

  • Tygacil has in vitro activity against a wide range of pathogens4,5
  • The structure of Tygacil overcomes most known tetracycline resistance mechanisms6

Proven effectiveness in the treatment of complicated intra-abdominal infections (cIAI)7

Global clinical cure rates in two clinical trials in clinically evaluable (CE) patients (n=1,642) at test of cure (TOC) was 86.1% for tigecycline and 86.2% for imipenem/ cilastatin7

Clinical response rates were 80.6% in patients treated with tigecycline monotherapy and 73.2% in patients treated with combination therapy in a pan-European “real-world” study of tigecycline8

Proven effectiveness in the treatment of skin and soft tissue infections (cSSTI)9

Global clinical cure rates in two clinical trials in CE patients (n=1,116) at TOC was 86.5% for tigecycline and 88.6% for vancomycin/ aztreonam9

Clinical response rates were 86.7% in patients treated with tigecycline monotherapy and 63.5% in patients treated with combination therapy in a pan-European “real-world” study of tigecycline10

References

  1. WHO fact sheet on antimicrobial resistance. Available here 
  2. Antimicrobial Resistance: Tackling a crisis for the health and wealth of nations. December 2014. Available here 
  3. Walker D and Fowler T. Annual Report of the Chief Medical Officer. Volume Two. London: Department of Health, 2011
  4. Tygacil Summary of Product Characteristics
  5. Wilcox M H. Tigecycline and the need for a new broad-spectrum antibiotic class. Surg Infect (Larchmt) 2006;7:69-80
  6. Bauer G, Berens C et al. Comparison of tetracycline and tigecycline binding to ribosomes mapped by dimethylsulphate and drug-directed Fe2+ cleavage of 16S rRNA. J Antimicrob Chemother 2004;53:592-599
  7. Babinchak T, Ellis-Grosse E et al. The efficacy and safety of tigecycline for the treatment of complicated intra-abdominal infections: analysis of pooled clinical trial data. Clin Infect Dis 2005;41 Suppl 5:S354-367
  8. Eckmann C, Montravers P et al. Efficacy of tigecycline for the treatment of complicated intra-abdominal infections in real-life clinical practice from five European observational studies. J Antimicrob Chemother 2013;68 Suppl 2:ii25-35
  9. Ellis-Grosse E J, Babinchak T et al. The efficacy and safety of tigecycline in the treatment of skin and skin-structure infections: results of 2 double-blind phase 3 comparison studies with vancomycin-aztreonam. Clin Infect Dis 2005;41 Suppl 5:S341-353
  10. Montravers P, Bassetti M et al. Efficacy of tigecycline for the treatment of complicated skin and soft-tissue infections in real-life clinical practice from five European observational studies. J Antimicrob Chemother 2013;68 Suppl 2:ii15-24