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A US study assessed the effects of treatment types on 12-week survival rates in a real-life clinical setting for haematopoietic stem cell therapy (HSCT) and solid-organ transplant (SOT) patients with invasive aspergillosis (IA)1

Haematopoietic Stem Cell Therapy (HSCT)

Survival rates for HSCT patients with IA treated with voriconazole (Vfend®) and other treatments in a real-life clinical setting1

Full preview Survival rates for HSCT patients with IA treated with voriconazole (Vfend®)

Adapted from Baddley et al, 20101

Combination therapy defined as initiation of two anti-fungal agents within 48 hours as primary therapy

Among 348 HSCT patients, fewer non-survivors received voriconazole than survivors (39.1% vs 53.6%; p=0.007)1

  • Results of multivariate regression analysis of the TRANSNET database1
    • Data available for 348 patients and refer to drug(s) used in initial regimen (primary therapy)1

Solid Organ Transplant (SOT)

  • Survival rates for SOT patients with IA treated with voriconazole and other treatments in a real-life clinical setting1
Full preview Survival rates for SOT patients with IA treated with voriconazole

Adapted from Baddley et al, 20101

Combination therapy defined as initiation of two antifungal agents within 48 hours as primary therapy

  • Results of multivariate regression analysis of the TRANSNET database1
    • Data available for 202 patients and refer to drug(s) used in initial regimen (primary therapy)

Overall survival at 3 months after diagnosis of IA2

    •    A prospective (2005–2007) hospital-based, multicentre surveillance study of EORTC/MSG-proven or probable IA cases (n=393 adults) whatever the underlying diseases in 12 French acute care teaching hospitals

IA survival probability by treatment in 12 French academic hospitals2

Full preview IA survival probability by treatment in 12 French academic hospitals

Adapted from Lortholary et al, 20112

Twelve-week overall mortality was 44.8% (95% confidence interval (CI) 39.8–50.0); it was 41% when first-line therapy included voriconazole and 60% otherwise (p<0.001).

Study details1

The purpose of this study was to evaluate factors associated with mortality in transplant patients with invasive aspergillosis (IA).

Transplant patients from 23 US centres were enrolled from March 2001 to October 2005 as part of the Transplant Associated Infection Surveillance Network (TRANSNET).

IA cases were identified prospectively in this cohort through March 2006, and data were collected. Factors associated with 12-week all-cause mortality were determined by logistic regression analysis and Cox proportional hazards regression.

In total, 642 cases of proven or probable IA were evaluated, of which 317 (49.4%) died by the study endpoint.

The primary outcome endpoint was all-cause mortality at 12-weeks post-diagnosis of IA

Study details2

A prospective (2005–2007) hospital-based multi-centre surveillance study of EORTC/MSG-proven or probable invasive aspergillosis (IA) cases (n=393 adults) whatever the underlying diseases in 12 French acute care teaching hospitals.

The aim was to describe incidence of IA per hospital whatever the underlying diseases, its potential variations according to centres and transplant procedures, and to assess the contribution of diagnostic tools, the first-line antifungals used and the prognostic factor. First-line treatment involved voriconazole, caspofungin and lipid formulations of amphotericin B, or any combination therapy.

EORTC/MSG, European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Invasive Fungal Infections Cooperative Group and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Mycoses Study Group; TRANSNET, Transplant Associated Infection Surveillance Network


References

    1.    Baddley JW, et al.  Clin Infect Dis. 2010; 50(12): 1559–67.
    2.    Lortholary O, et al. Clin Microbial Infect. 2011; 17(12): 1882–9.